***** 30 NEW FLASK VARIETIES JUST LISTED *****

Growing Guides

About Our Guides

Below you will find our Grower’s Guides for Orchids and Bromeliads. Information is given in good faith and as a lot of growers know, what works for us may not always work for you and your conditions or climate. We stopped growing Bromeliads after 20 years to focus on growing Orchids, but have kept this information and our Grower’s Guides on Bromeliads available for growers. Happy Growing!

Orchids

Orchids in general do not like a lot of water and most first time growers tend to over water orchids with the same kindness as their other plants. Orchids are extremely rewarding to grow. There are orchid varieties suited to all locations including hot or cold conditions or locations.

Orchids are easy to grow under a patio, veranda, shade house, under, near, or in a tree, in hanging baskets, etc. As always, there are exceptions, however, most plants like to be grown in shade with some filtered light and not direct sunlight. There are also orchids that can be grown all year ‘round inside your home.

Please click on the list below for more information and our Grower’s Guides.

Orchid Guides

Potting Mixes

Read Guide

Watering

Read Guide

Growing in your garden?

Read Guide

Growing orchids indoors

Read Guide

Starting a collection

Read Guide

After flowering

Read Guide

My Orchids look yellow

Read Guide

Repotting

Read Guide

Deflasking

Read Guide

Pollinating flowers

Read Guide

Growing orchids from seed

Read Guide

Seed pod development

Read Guide

Fundamentals of flasking

Read Guide

Fungus

Read Guide

Pests

Read Guide

Bromeliads

The majority of Bromeliads will grow fine with other plants in the garden or in pots. Just remember that bromeliads are part of the air plant family. Broms (Bromeliads) are extremely easy to grow and can be grown under a patio, veranda, shade house, under or in a tree, in a hanging basket, in the garden, etc. Broms are one of the easiest plants to grow.

Important: Please keep your Bromeliads away from copper. Copper can kill bromeliads. This can include run off from copper treated logs and also some fungicide sprays may contain copper so be careful of this.

As Bromeliads are part of the air plant family, try not to spray any amounts of pest oils around them as this can suffocate your plant.

Most new growers are also surprised to know how many different types of bromeliads there are. Even the eatable pineapple is a bromeliad. The air plant Tillandsia Usneoides (more commonly known as “Old man’s beard,” “Grandfather’s beard,” “Grandfather’s whiskers,” or “Spanish moss”) is also a type of bromeliad.

Please click on the list below for more information and our Grower’s Guides.

 

Bromeliads Guides

Potting Mixes

Read Guide

Watering

Read Guide

Growing in your garden?

Read Guide

Growing bromeliads indoors

Read Guide

My Bromeliad looks like it’s dying

Read Guide

After flowering

Read Guide

Breaking Up & dividing Bromeliads

Read Guide

Pollinating flowers

Read Guide

Growing Bromeliads from seed

Read Guide

Pests

Read Guide

Marking on the leaves

Read Guide